Citation Formats: Home

A guide to the different citation formats including MLA, Chicago, and others

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Introduction

There are many different ways to cite a source in a paper.  This guide looks at some of the major formating styles in use.  You can click on any of the tabs to view the different formats.  Chances are your professor wants you to use a certain formating style.  This guide attempts to answer many questions, but it certainly doesn't have every possible example.  If you cannot find the information you are looking for please contact the Service Desk in the Main Library; you can stop by, call, email or chat with us.

See: EndNote Basic and EndNote Desktop for information about a tool that can streamline your citation management needs.

Important Note

The second line on a citation must be indented (or "Tabbed") for the citation styles in this guide.  This isn't always the case in how examples are displayed here, but it should happen in your bibliographic entry.

FAQ

Why do I need to use this?

When doing research it is often necessary to consult other research.  When you use an idea or statistic that comes from someone else, you need to give them credit for the information; failure to do this is considered plagiarism. 

Why can't I find the one I need?

If the tabs above do not have an example to help you then please contact the Service Desk. 

Is there something I can print out as a guide?

How do I cite datasets?

 See this page on the Digital Curation Center web site. http://www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/how-guides/cite-datasets

Are there other tools popular with students?

Try the Purdue OWL: Research and Citations guide for additional content and perspective.

Contact Me

Brett Cloyd
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