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Cathy Cranston: Team Leader, Undergraduate Research & Experience

Undergraduate Engagement Librarian

Cathy Cranston's picture
Cathy Cranston
Contact:
2012 Main Library
319-384-2090
Skype Contact

About Cathy

Cathy Cranston is an Undergraduate Engagement Librarian and is currently the Team Leader for Undergraduate Research & Experience. She is a liaison to the Rhetoric Department and also does instruction for ESL and IEP classes. Her areas of research interests include information literacy, instruction, and library management. She is interested in working with campus faculty and instructors to build information literacy concepts directly into their courses. 

CV

Education

M.A. Library and Information Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa - 1998
B.A. Anthropology, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa - 1994
Study Abroad, St. Anne's College, Oxford University, Oxford, UK - 1993

Publications and other Intellectual Contributions

Information Literacy à la carte and Source Deck materials. Open educational resources published on Google Drive, developed in conjunction with IDEAL: Iowa Digital Engagement & Learning.

McLure, Merinda, Allison V. Level, Catherine L. Cranston, Beth Oehlerts, and Mike Culbertson, 2014, “Data Curation: A Study of Researcher Practices and Needs,” portal: Libraries and the Academy, Vol. 14 (2). 

Farrell, Shannon, Catherine L. Cranston, and Jeffrey Bullington, 2013, “Embracing INTO: Library Plans and Campus Collaboration to Serve an Increased International Student Population,” Collaborative Librarianship, Vol. 5 (2).

Cranston, Catherine L., 2013, “Anthropology,” In: Instruction that Works: A Guide to Teaching by Discipline and Student Population (Patrick Ragains, ed. ALA Publishing).

Cranston, Catherine L., 2012, “Competing with Robots: Making Research Skills Relevant to 21st Century Students,” In: Proceedings of the World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2012 (T. Amiel & B. Wilson, eds., Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education).

Blair, Joanna & Cathy Cranston, February 2006, “Preparing for the Birth of our Library Blog,” Computers in Libraries, Vol. 26(2).

Cranston, Catherine & Allison Level, Spring 2006, “Forward Progress One-step at a Time: Instruction Workshops, Assessment, and the Reference Connection,” Public Services Quarterly, Vol. 2(2/3). Co-published in: Reference Assessment and Evaluation (Tom Diamond & Mark Sanders, eds., Haworth Information Press.)

Beam, Joan & Cathy Cranston, 2005, “Research, Creative Activities and Publication by Academic Librarians,” In: The Successful Academic Librarian: Winning Strategies from Library Leaders (Gwen M. Gregory, ed., Information Today/Plexus Publishing.)

Level, Allison V. & Catherine L. Cranston, Winter 2003, “Enticing Faculty to Library Instruction Workshops,” Academic Exchange Quarterly, Vol. 7(4).

Mach, Michelle & Cathy Cranston, 2003, “You Can Take It With You: Portable Library Instruction,” Proceedings of the E-Learn 2003 World Conference.

Presentations

2017 June 25, "The Art of Asking: Salary Negotiation for Library Workers." Co-presenter of an ALA-APA presentation and discussion, with Shannon Farrell (lead), Aliqae Geraci, and Michael Wasser, American Library Association Annual Conference, Chicago, IL.

2012 June 28, “Competing with Robots: Making Research Skills Relevant to 21st Century Students.” EdMedia World Conference, Denver, CO.

2010 October 25, “Google and Facebook Ads: An Experiment in Delivering Library Resources at the Point of Need.” Co-presenter with Michelle Wilde and Louise Feldmann. Internet Librarian Conference, Monterey, CA.

2003 November 9, “You Can Take It with You: Portable Library Instruction.” Co-Presenter with Michelle Mach, E-Learn 2003 World Conference, Phoenix, AZ, Refereed.

Guide List

Favorite Quote / Favorite Book

“But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”